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Lu Shan Yun Wu Tea

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Product details

Essential
  • Harvest: 2021, Ming Qian
  • Origin: Lushan, Jiangxi, China
  • Caffeine : < 50mg/Cup
  • Grade: Supreme ★★★★ 
  • Brew Ratio : 1: 40~50
  • Expired Date: 18 Months
  • Storage Conditions: Dry, Refrigerated, No odor, Well-Sealed, Sunshine Shielded, Low Temperature; 

What is Lu Shan Yun Wu Tea

Lu Shan Yun Wu Green Tea is a type of green tea that comes from China. It's one the most famous teas in all Asia, and it belongs to what we call "the five fundamentals" or just 'levels'. This means there are many different types within this category - but for our purposes here at least (and based on how things were described), let’s focus specifically only upon LuShanYunWu Grade 1 greens which contain large amounts of wild shrubs with fat buds! These blessings were first started during ancient times when the tribute meant giving thanks because someone had done something nice for you; then eventually became used as payment towards goods/services to follow.

What is Lu Shan Yun Wu Tea Used For?

It's used as a means of treating high blood pressure, glucose, body pain, and the common cold. Furthermore, it can help you fight cancer, prevent illnesses caused by damage to your DNA genome (such as psoriasis), make skin glow with a radiance more vibrant along with better skin tone, more elasticity yet some smoother texture too! It can also be used to clear up urinary tract infections thanks to its diuretic action on the kidneys - i.e., for some people, this helps them pass their urine easier! All in all that’s enough reasons there are why it's one of the highest quality/most expensive types available on Earth today!

Lu Shan Yun Wu Tea Processing

For LuShanYunWu Grade 1 teas, the processing method includes:

A.a. Plucking: It is plucked and then it goes through a fermentation process to remove moisture and maintain the flavors/fragrances of the tea leaves; B.b. Steaming: This next step in processing is when they steam them afterward so they will be more stable under high heat with minimal loss of nutrients - i.e., so these can stay fresh longer with less oxidation (which helps keep their flavors intact!); C.c. Rolling/Tossing/Drying: The final stage of production before packing occurs where this tea type gets rolled along with tossed about, then dried under high heat - this is all done to reduce the moisture levels and stop oxidation. Finally, it's sorted and packaged into small tea leaves that are ready to be shipped off to various locations around the world where they will be enjoyed!

How to Make Lu Shan Yun Wu Tea

When you go to brew your tea, use fresh cold water that has just been boiled and let it cool down for about 2 minutes so it's not too hot. Afterward, take a teaspoon of the tea leaves and put them into your teapot or teacup; then add the water (which should be around 80-85 degrees Celsius) and cover it for steeping. Allow it to steep for about 3-5 minutes, then remove the leaves and enjoy!

Brewing Tips:

- For a stronger tea, use more leaves;

- For a weaker tea, use fewer leaves;

- Don't steep for too long or leave the leaves in the water as it will make your tea bitter.

Lu Shan Yun Wu Tea Side Effects

There aren't any known Lu Shan Yun Wu tea side effects if consumed in moderation. That said, it's never a good idea to drink too much tea of any type - for health and safety purposes; even though the benefits far outweigh any potential risks associated with doing so!

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The Tea Bridge

Chinese Tea Culture

Tea plays an important role in China. It is commonly consumed at social events, and many cultures have created intricate formal ceremonies for these events. Afternoon tea is a British custom with widespread appeal. Tea ceremonies, with their roots in the Chinese tea culture, differ among East Asian countries, such as the Japanese or Korean versions. Tea may differ widely in preparation, such as in Tibet, where the beverage is commonly brewed with salt and butter. Tea may be drunk in small private gatherings (tea parties) or in public (tea houses designed for social interaction).

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