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150g 5oz Supreme Taiwan Formosa Ali Mountain Milk Oolong Tea Tin

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Specification: ● Origin: Ali Shan (Ali Mountain), Taiwan  ● Tea Type: Loose leaf   ● Net Weight : 150g (~5.3oz.) ● Expired Date:...
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Product details

Specification:
● Origin: Ali Shan (Ali Mountain), Taiwan 
● Tea Type: Loose leaf  
● Net Weight : 150g (~5.3oz.)
● Expired Date: 18 months; 
● Package : Well packaged in Tin
● Storage Conditions: Dry, No odor, Well-Sealed, Sunshine Shielded; 
   

About  Taiwan Ali Mountain Dong Ding Oolong Tea 
As Taiwan is lucky to have great environment for tea growing, and with the developing of tea technology, Taiwan has produced many top quality teas, all can be called as “Formosa Tea”. The best known ones including "Formosa Dongding oolong", "Formosa Alishan (Ali Mountain) Oolong", "Formosa Wenshan Pouchong","Formosa Oriental Beauty", "Formosa Shanlinxi Oolong", "Formosa Jade Oolong" and more.  
 
Dongding Tea, grown on Dongding mountain in Nantou County, was brought to Taiwan during the 19th century from the mainland's Wuyi Mountains.Its special qualities have been attributed to an almost continuous fog.Teas harvested in the spring are entered in a competition and the winners are quickly bespoken at premium prices, fetching US $2,000 for a 600-gram package during the 1990s. It undergoes less fermentation than most oolongs.A 40-minute roasting over charcoal contributes to its flavor, which also has "nutty, caramel, and chestnut" elements. 

 

 

Brewing 
Generally, 3 grams of tea per 200 ml of water, or about two teaspoons of oolong tea per cup, should be used. Oolong teas should be prepared with 200 to 205 °F (93 to 96 °C) water (not boiling) and steeped 3–10 minutes. High quality oolong can be steeped several times from the same leaves and, unlike other teas, it improves with rebrewing: it is common to steep the same leaves three to five times, the third or fourth steeping usually being considered the best.
 
A widely used ceremonial method of steeping oolongs in Taiwan and China is called gongfucha. This method uses a small steeping vessel, such as a gaiwan or Yixing clay teapot, with more tea than usual for the amount of water used. Multiple short steeps of 20 seconds to 1 minute are performed; the tea is often served in one- to two-ounce tasting cups.
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The Tea Bridge

Chinese Tea Culture

Tea plays an important role in China. It is commonly consumed at social events, and many cultures have created intricate formal ceremonies for these events. Afternoon tea is a British custom with widespread appeal. Tea ceremonies, with their roots in the Chinese tea culture, differ among East Asian countries, such as the Japanese or Korean versions. Tea may differ widely in preparation, such as in Tibet, where the beverage is commonly brewed with salt and butter. Tea may be drunk in small private gatherings (tea parties) or in public (tea houses designed for social interaction).

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