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20bags Top Grade Dried Assorted Herbal Tea (Longan+Jujube+Lycii) 15g/bag

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$19.99
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This is a mixed herbal tea bags which allow you to brew Longan+Jujube+Lycii from dried to soup with easy way.  ...
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This is a mixed herbal tea bags which allow you to brew Longan+Jujube+Lycii from dried to soup with easy way.
 
Specification
 
● Origin: Ningxia(Lycii) + Xinjiang (Jujube) + Fujian (Longan), China
● Tea Type: Dried and bagged
● Net Weight : About 300g (20bags) 
● Expired Date:  18 Months
● Storage Conditions: Clean, Ventilating, Lucifuge, Dry, No Srange Smell And Pollution
 
 
About the Lycii (Gouji)
 
Goji, goji berry or wolfberry is the fruit of Lycium barbarum and Lycium chinense (pinyin: gǒuqǐ), two closely related species of boxthorn in the nightshade family, Solanaceae. The family also includes the potato, tomato, eggplant, belladonna, chili pepper. The two species are native to Asia. 
 
Wolfberries are celebrated each August in Ningxia with an annual festival coinciding with the berry harvest. Originally held in Ningxia's capital, Yinchuan, the festival has been based since 2000 in Zhongning County, an important center of wolfberry cultivation for the region. As Ningxia's borders merge with three deserts, wolfberries are also planted to control erosion and reclaim irrigable soils from desertification.
 
China, the main supplier of wolfberry products in the world, had total exports generating US$120 million in 2004. This production derived from 82,000 hectare farmed nationwide, yielding 95,000 tons of wolfberries, which has increased from larger acreages cultivated in recent years. 
 
 
About the Longan
 
Longan is commonly and an unusual occurrence since, prior to the 1800s, longan was most prevalent in Asia.However, thanks to scientific and technological advances, studies have shown that longan extracts can be introduced into the drinking market in the near future. 
 
 
 
 
 
About the Jujube
  
 
The freshly harvested, as well as the candied dried fruit, are often eaten as a snack, or with coffee. Smoked jujubes are consumed in Vietnam and are referred to as black jujubes. Both China and Korea produce a sweetened tea syrup containing jujube fruit in glass jars, and canned jujube tea or jujube tea in the form of teabags. To a lesser extent, jujube fruit is made into juice and jujube vinegar . They are used for making pickles in west Bengal and Bangladesh. In China, a wine made from jujube fruit is called hong zao jiu.
 
Sometimes pieces of jujube fruit are preserved by storing them in a jar filled with baijiu (Chinese liquor), which allows them to be kept fresh for a long time, especially through the winter. Such jujubes are called jiu zao . The fruit is also a significant ingredient in a wide variety of Chinese delicacies.
 
In Vietnam and Taiwan, fully mature, nearly ripe fruit is harvested and sold on the local markets and also exported to Southeast Asian countries.The dried fruit is used in desserts in China and Vietnam, such as ching bo leung, a cold beverage that includes the dried jujube, longan, fresh seaweed, barley, and lotus seeds.
 
The jujube's sweet smell is believed to make teenagers fall in love, and as a result, in the Himalaya and Karakoram regions, boys take a stem of sweet-smelling jujube flowers with them or put it on their hats to attract girls.
 
In the traditional Chinese wedding ceremony, the jujube was often placed in the newlyweds' bedroom as a good luck charm for fertility, along with peanuts, longan, and chestnuts, punning on an invocation to "have an honored child soon".
 
In Bhutan, the leaves are used as a potpourri to help keep homes smelling fresh and clean. It is also used to keep bugs and other insects out of the house and free of infestation.
Brewing guideline
 
 Pick up 1 bag (about 15g) Mixed dried herbal tea and Steep with 80-100C boiled water for 3-7 minutes then serve.
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The Tea Bridge

Chinese Tea Culture

Tea plays an important role in China. It is commonly consumed at social events, and many cultures have created intricate formal ceremonies for these events. Afternoon tea is a British custom with widespread appeal. Tea ceremonies, with their roots in the Chinese tea culture, differ among East Asian countries, such as the Japanese or Korean versions. Tea may differ widely in preparation, such as in Tibet, where the beverage is commonly brewed with salt and butter. Tea may be drunk in small private gatherings (tea parties) or in public (tea houses designed for social interaction).

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